back to main menu

links to relevent geological sites

 

TITTERSTONE CLEE

bivalves brachiopods gastropods fish plants

Remarkably Titterstone Clee (533m), and the neighbouring Brown Clee (540m) to the north, survive as the highest points in Shropshire despite being on the 'lowland' side of the county. This is due to the presence of the sill of dolerite which caps both hills, and protects the summits from erosion.

Titterstone Clee provides one of the best views in England (on a good day!).  From the summit there are 360degree views: West into Wales, north to the North Shropshire Plain and the Wrekin, east to the Clent hills and south to the Malverns and Black Mountains.


There are few places in Shropshire that more clearly reflect their geological foundations than Titterstone Clee, which is why it is an SSSI (click here to see the reasons for notification). The distinctive profile of the hill follows the gently dipping line of the volcanic sills which cap the two parts of the plateau top. The history of settlement on the hill is intimately linked to its geological resources - first through exploitation of the Carboniferous limestone, clays, ironstone and coal and then from the nineteenth century onwards, the more intensive quarrying of the dolerite; first as road setts and now as aggregate. And the ecological interest similarly reflects this varied geology which presents a microcosm of the Carboniferous of England from the Carboniferous Limestone through to the Upper Coal Measures, as well as the underlying Devonian (formerly Old Red Sandstone) sediments.

For more detailed geology click here

click an icon to find out more about the geology of this site

BACK TO TOP 20 MAP (SOUTH) BACK TO TOP 20 LIST BACK TO SHROPSHIRE GEOLOGY INTRO